Since unification of the two Germanies in 1990, the number of players from the former East Germany who have been selected for the national squad has fluctuated wildly. While in the early 2000s things had looked encouraging for the former East – reaching a peak in 2002 when seven players made the World Cup squad – less than ten years later things had started to look less promising, with only one representative making the squad of twenty-three selected for the FIFA World Cup in South Africa.

The following section provides a more detailed breakdown of all of the tournament squads since 1992, as well as a graph plotting the number of Eastern German representatives against those born in the former West Germany and an increasing continent of players born outside Germany. The trends are certainly interesting.


UEFA European Championship Sweden 1992

Germany’s first major international tournament as an united nation was in Sweden in 1992 – a squad of twenty-two players was selected, including three players from the former East Germany.

Players born in the former BRD (17)

Manfred Binz (Frankfurt am Main, Hessen), Andreas Brehme (Hamburg, Hamburg), Guido Buchwald (Berlin-West, Berlin), Stefan Effenberg (Hamburg, Hamburg), Michael Frontzeck (Mönchengladbach, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Thomas Häßler (Berlin-West, Berlin), Thomas Helmer (Herford, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Bodo Illgner (Koblenz, Rheinland-Pfalz), Jürgen Klinsmann (Göppingen, Baden-Württemberg), Andreas Köpke (Kiel, Schleswig-Holstein), Jürgen Kohler (Lambsheim, Rheinland-Pfalz), Andreas Möller (Frankfurt am Main, Hessen) , Stefan Reuter (Dinkelsbühl, Bayern), Karl-Heinz Riedle (Weiler im Allgäu, Bayern), Michael Schulz (Witten, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Rudi Völler (Hanau, Hessen), Christian Wörns (Mannheim, Baden-Württemberg)

Players born in the former DDR (3)

Thomas Doll (Malchin, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern), Matthias Sammer (Dresden, Sachsen), Andreas Thom (Rüdersdorf bei Berlin, Brandenburg)


FIFA World Cup United States 1994

The twenty-two man squad for the 1994 FIFA World Cup featured two of the three ex-DDR players who had featured in the European Championship finals two years earlier.

Players born in the former BRD (20)

Mario Basler (Neustadt an der Weinstraße, Rheinland-Pfalz), Thomas Berthold (Hanau, Hessen), Andreas Brehme (Hamburg, Hamburg), Guido Buchwald (Berlin-West, Berlin), Stefan Effenberg (Hamburg, Hamburg), Maurizio Gaudino (Brühl, Baden-Württemberg), Thomas Häßler (Berlin-West, Berlin), Thomas Helmer (Herford, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Bodo Illgner (Koblenz, Rheinland-Pfalz), Oliver Kahn (Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg), Jürgen Klinsmann (Göppingen, Baden-Württemberg), Andreas Köpke (Kiel, Schleswig-Holstein), Jürgen Kohler (Lambsheim, Rheinland-Pfalz), Stefan Kuntz (Neunkirchen, Saarland), Lothar Matthäus (Erlangen, Bayern), Andreas Möller (Frankfurt am Main, Hessen), Karl-Heinz Riedle (Weiler im Allgäu, Bayern), Thomas Strunz (Duisburg, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Rudi Völler (Hanau, Hessen), Martin Wagner (Offenburg, Baden-Württemberg)

Players born in the former DDR (2)

Ulf Kirsten (Riesa, Sachsen), Matthias Sammer (Dresden, Sachsen)


UEFA European Championship England 1996

The Euro 1996 squad featured three players born in the former East; two were from the “second generation”, with Matthias Sammer being the only veteran ex-DDR international. The squad originally consisted of twenty-two players, on account of ongoing injury problems SC Freiburg’s Jens Todt was permitted by UEFA to join the squad.

Players born in the former BRD (19)

Markus Babbel (München, Bayern), Mario Basler (Neustadt an der Weinstraße, Rheinland-Pfalz), Oliver Bierhoff (Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg), Marco Bode (Osterode am Harz, Niedersachsen), Dieter Eilts (Upgant-Schott, Niedersachsen), Thomas Häßler (Berlin-West, Berlin), Thomas Helmer (Herford, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Oliver Kahn (Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg), Jürgen Klinsmann (Göppingen, Baden-Württemberg), Andreas Köpke (Kiel, Schleswig-Holstein), Jürgen Kohler (Lambsheim, Rheinland-Pfalz), Stefan Kuntz (Neunkirchen, Saarland), Andreas Möller (Frankfurt am Main, Hessen), Oliver Reck (Frankfurt am Main, Hessen), Stefan Reuter (Dinkelsbühl, Bayern), Mehmet Scholl (Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg), Thomas Strunz (Duisburg, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Jens Todt (Hameln, Niedersachsen), Christian Ziege (Berlin-West, Berlin)

Players born in the former DDR (3)

Steffen Freund (Brandenburg, Brandenburg), Matthias Sammer (Dresden, Sachsen), René Schneider (Schwerin, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern)

Players born outside Germany (1)

Fredi Bobic (Maribor, SFR Yugoslavia)


FIFA World Cup France 1998

The FIFA World Cup finals in France saw an increase the number of DDR-born personnel, with there being five easterners in the twenty-two man squad. Two of these five had played for the DDR national side before its absorption into the DFB in 1990.

Players born in the former BRD (17)

Markus Babbel (München, Bayern), Oliver Bierhoff (Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg), Thomas Häßler (Berlin-West, Berlin), Dietmar Hamann (Wildsassen, Bayern), Thomas Helmer (Herford, Nordrhein-Westfalen) , Oliver Kahn (Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg), Jürgen Klinsmann (Göppingen, Baden-Württemberg), Jürgen Kohler (Lambsheim, Rheinland-Pfalz), Andreas Köpke (Kiel, Schleswig-Holstein), Jens Lehmann (Essen, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Lothar Matthäus (Erlangen, Bayern), Andreas Möller (Frankfurt am Main, Hessen),Stefan Reuter (Dinkelsbühl, Bayern), Michael Tarnat (Hilden, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Olaf Thon (Gelsenkirchen, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Christian Wörns (Mannheim, Baden-Württemberg), Christian Ziege (Berlin-West, Berlin)

Players born in the former DDR (5)

Steffen Freund (Brandenburg, Brandenburg), Jörg Heinrich (Rathenow, Brandenburg), Jens Jeremies (Görlitz, Sachsen), Ulf Kirsten (Riesa, Sachsen), Olaf Marschall (Torgau, Sachsen)


UEFA European Championship Belgium/The Netherlands 2000

The Euro 2000 squad saw a further increase in the number of easterners, with six making the final twenty-two. Technically this was seven as Dariusz Wosz, although born in Poland, was also a former DDR international. The squad also included another player born outside Germany, the Brazilian-born striker Paulo Rink.

Players born in the former BRD (14)

Markus Babbel (München, Bayern), Oliver Bierhoff (Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg), Marco Bode (Osterode am Harz, Niedersachsen), Hans-Jörg Butt (Oldenburg, Niedersachsen), Sebastian Deisler (Lörrach, Baden-Württemberg), Thomas Häßler (Berlin-West, Berlin), Dietmar Hamann (Waldsassen, Bayern), Oliver Kahn (Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg), Jens Lehmann (Essen, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Lothar Matthäus (Erlangen, Bayern), Jens Nowotny (Malsch, Baden-Württemberg), Carsten Ramelow (Berlin-West, Berlin), Mehmet Scholl (Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg), Christian Ziege (Berlin-West, Berlin)

Players born in the former DDR (6)

Michael Ballack (Görlitz, Sachsen), Carsten Jancker (Grevesmühlen, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern), Jens Jeremies (Görlitz, Sachsen), Ulf Kirsten (Riesa, Sachsen), Thomas Linke (Sömmerda, Thüringen), Marko Rehmer (Berlin-Ost, Berlin)

Players born outside Germany (2)*

Paulo Rink (Curitiba, Brazil), Dariusz Wosz (Deutsch Piekar, Poland)


FIFA World Cup Japan/Korea 2002

The twenty-three man squad for the FIFA World Cup finals in Japan and South Korea featured seven players from the former east, all of whom were “second generation” products of the former DDR youth system. There were also three players born outside Germany including Ghanaian-born Gerald Asamoah, who became the first player of African descent to play for the Nationalmannschaft in a major international tournament.

Players born in the former BRD (13)

Frank Baumann (Würzburg, Bayern), Oliver Bierhoff (Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg), Marco Bode (Osterode am Harz, Niedersachsen), Hans-Jörg Butt (Oldenburg, Niedersachsen), Torsten Frings (Würselen, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Dietmar Hamann (Wildsassen, Bayern), Oliver Kahn (Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg), Sebastian Kehl (Fulda, Hessen), Jens Lehmann (Essen, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Christoph Metzelder (Haltern, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Carsten Ramelow (Berlin-West, Berlin), Lars Ricken (Dortmund, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Christian Ziege (Berlin-West, Berlin)

Players born in the former DDR (7)

Michael Ballack (Görlitz, Sachsen), Jörg Böhme (Hohenmölsen, Sachsen-Anhalt), Carsten Jancker (Grevesmühlen, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern), Jens Jeremies (Görlitz, Sachsen), Thomas Linke (Sömmerda, Thüringen), Marko Rehmer (Berlin-Ost, Berlin), Bernd Schneider (Jena, Thüringen)

Players born outside Germany (3)

Gerald Asamoah (Mampong, Ghana), Miroslav Klose (Oppeln, Poland), Oliver Neuville (Locarno, Switzerland)


UEFA European Championship Portugal 2004

Having reached a its peak of seven at the 2002 World Cup, the number of players from the former DDR who were selected in the twenty-three man squad for Euro 2004 had dropped to three. For the first time the number of players from the eastern Länder were overtaken by those born outside Germany.

Players born in the former BRD (16)

Frank Baumann (Würzburg, Bayern), Thomas Brdarić (Nürtingen, Baden-Württemberg), Fabian Ernst (Hannover, Niedersachsen), Arne Friedrich (Bad Oeynhausen, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Torsten Frings (Würselen, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Dietmar Hamann (Wildsassen, Bayern), Timo Hildebrand (Worms, Rheinland-Pfalz), Andreas Hinkel (Backnang, Baden-Württemberg), Oliver Kahn (Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg), Sebastian Kehl (Fulda, Hessen), Philipp Lahm (München, Bayern), Jens Lehmann (Essen, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Jens Nowotny (Malsch, Baden-Württemberg), Bastian Schweinsteiger (Kolbermoor, Bayern), Christian Wörns (Mannheim, Baden-Württemberg), Christian Ziege (Berlin-West, Berlin)

Players born in the former DDR (3)

Michael Ballack (Görlitz, Sachsen), Jens Jeremies (Görlitz, Sachsen), Bernd Schneider (Jena, Thüringen)

Players born outside Germany (4)

Fredi Bobić (Maribor, SFR Yugoslavia), Miroslav Klose (Oppeln, Poland), Kevin Kurányi (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil), Lukas Podolski (Gleiwitz, Poland)


FIFA World Cup Germany 2006

The twenty-three players for the 2006 FIFA World Cup – held in Germany – included four players from the former DDR, the same as the number of foreign-born players in the side. The four Easterners would come from all corners of the region: the capital city Berlin (Robert Huth), the east (Michael Ballack), the west (Bernd Schneider) and the north (Tim Borowski).

Players born in the former BRD (15)

Arne Friedrich (Bad Oeynhausen, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Torsten Frings (Würselen, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Mike Hanke (Hamm, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Timo Hildebrand (Worms, Rheinland-Pfalz), Thomas Hitzlsperger (München, Bayern), Marcell Jansen (Mönchengladbach, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Oliver Kahn (Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg), Sebastian Kehl (Fulda, Hessen), Philipp Lahm (München, Bayern), Jens Lehmann (Essen, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Per Mertesacker (Hannover, Niedersachsen), Christoph Metzelder (Haltern, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Jens Nowotny (Malsch, Baden-Württemberg), David Odonkor (Bünde, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Bastian Schweinsteiger (Kolbermoor, Bayern)

Players born in the former DDR (4)

Michael Ballack (Görlitz, Sachsen), Tim Borowski (Neubrandenburg, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern), Robert Huth (Berlin-Ost, Berlin), Bernd Schneider (Jena, Thüringen)

Players born outside Germany (4)

Gerald Asamoah (Mampong, Ghana), Miroslav Klose (Oppeln, Poland), Oliver Neuville (Locarno, Switzerland), Lukas Podolski (Gleiwitz, Poland)


UEFA European Championship Austria/Switzerland 2008

The twenty-three strong squad for the 2008 European Championship finals would contain five players from the former DDR, but also five born outside Germany.

Players born in the former BRD (13)

Arne Friedrich (Bad Oeynhausen, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Torsten Frings (Würselen, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Mario Gómez (Riedlingen, Baden-Württemberg), Thomas Hitzlsperger (München, Bayern), Marcell Jansen (Mönchengladbach, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Philipp Lahm (München, Bayern), Jens Lehmann (Essen, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Per Mertesacker (Hannover, Niedersachsen), Christoph Metzelder (Haltern, Nordrhein-Westfalen), David Odonkor (Bünde, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Simon Rolfes (Ibbenbüren, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Bastian Schweinsteiger (Kolbermoor, Bayern), Heiko Westermann (Alzenau, Bayern)

Players born in the former DDR (5)

René Adler (Leipzig, Sachsen), Michael Ballack (Görlitz, Sachsen), Tim Borowski (Neubrandenburg, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern), Robert Enke (Jena, Thüringen), Clemens Fritz (Erfurt, Thüringen)

Players born outside Germany (5)

Miroslav Klose (Oppeln, Poland), Kevin Kurányi (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil), Oliver Neuville (Locarno, Switzerland), Lukas Podolski (Gleiwitz, Poland), Piotr Trochowski (Dirschau, Poland)


FIFA World Cup South Africa 2010

Out of a squad of twenty-three players that travelled to South Africa in 2010, seventeen were born the former Federal Republic; five were born outside of the country, while only one – Toni Kroos – was born in the former East Germany. Of the five players who were born outside Germany all were brought up in the West from a young age, with the exception of Cacau who acquired German nationality as an adult.

Players born in the former BRD (17)

Dennis Aogo (Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg), Holger Badstuber (Memmingen, Bayern), Jérôme Boateng (Berlin-West, Berlin), Hans-Jörg Butt (Oldenburg, Niedersachsen), Arne Friedrich (Bad Oeynhausen, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Mario Gómez (Riedlingen, Baden-Württemberg), Marcell Jansen (Mönchengladbach, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Sami Khedira (Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg), Stefan Kießling (Lichtenfels, Bayern), Philipp Lahm (München, Bayern), Per Mertesacker (Hannover, Niedersachsen), Thomas Müller (Weilheim, Bayern), Manuel Neuer (Gelsenkirchen, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Mesut Özil (Gelsenkirchen, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Bastian Schweinsteiger (Kolbermoor, Bayern), Serdar Taşçı (Esslingen am Neckar, Baden-Württemberg), Tim Wiese (Bergisch Gladbach, Nordrhein-Westfalen)

Players born in the former DDR (1)

Toni Kroos (Greifswald, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern)

Players born outside Germany (5)

Cacau (Santo André, São Paulo, Brazil), Miroslav Klose (Oppeln, Poland), Marko Marin (Bosanska Gradiška, SFR Yugoslavia), Lukas Podolski (Gleiwitz, Poland), Piotr Trochowski (Dirschau, Poland)


UEFA European Championship Poland/Ukraine 2012

The twenty-three man squad selected for the 2012 European Championship finals saw a slight improvement in the number of players born in the Eastern Länder, with Toni Kroos being joined by Marcel Schmelzer. There was a significant drop in the number of players born outside Germany – from five down to two, and the number of those born in the Western Länder rose to nineteen.

The squad was the first to feature players born after German unification; İlkay Gündoğan was born just three weeks after the two Germanies were united, André Schürrle the month after, and teenager Mario Götze in 1992.

Players born in the former BRD/Western Länder (19)

Holger Badstuber (born Memmingen, Bayern), Lars Bender (Rosenheim, Bayern), Jérôme Boateng (Berlin-West, Berlin), Mario Götze (Memmingen, Bayern), Mario Gómez (Riedlingen, Baden-Württemberg), İlkay Gündoğan (Gelsenkirchen, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Benedikt Höwedes (Haltern, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Mats Hummels (Bergisch Gladbach, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Sami Khedira (Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg), Philipp Lahm (München, Bayern), Per Mertesacker (Hannover, Niedersachsen), Thomas Müller (Weilheim, Bayern), Manuel Neuer (Gelsenkirchen, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Mesut Özil (Gelsenkirchen, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Marco Reus (Dortmund, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Bastian Schweinsteiger (Kolbermoor, Bayern), André Schürrle (Ludwigshafen, Rheinland-Pfalz), Tim Wiese (Bergisch Gladbach, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Ron-Robert Zieler (Köln, Nordrhein-Westfalen)

Players born in the former DDR (2)

Toni Kroos (Greifswald, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern), Marcel Schmelzer (Magdeburg, Sachsen-Anhalt)

Players born outside Germany (2)

Miroslav Klose (Oppeln, Poland), Lukas Podolski (Gleiwitz, Poland)


FIFA World Cup Brazil 2014

The twenty-three man squad selected for the 2014 World Cup finals saw a return to just the one Eastern-born player: Toni Kroos. The number of players born outside Germany remained at two, while the number of those born in the Western Länder rose to twenty.

Seven players were born after German unification, all in the west: Julian Draxler, Erik Durm, Matthias Ginter, Mario Götze, Christoph Kramer, Shkodran Mustafi and André Schürrle.

Players born in the former BRD/Western Länder (20)

Jérôme Boateng (Berlin-West, Berlin), Julian Draxler (Gladbeck, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Erik Durm (Pirmasens, Rheinland-Pfalz), Matthias Ginter (Freiburg im Breisgau, Baden-Württemberg), Mario Götze (Memmingen, Bayern), Kevin Großkreutz (Dortmund, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Benedikt Höwedes (Haltern, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Mats Hummels (Bergisch Gladbach, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Sami Khedira (Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg), Christoph Kramer (Solingen, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Philipp Lahm (München, Bayern), Per Mertesacker (Hannover, Niedersachsen), Thomas Müller (Weilheim, Bayern), Shkodran Mustafi (Bad Hersfeld, Hessen), Manuel Neuer (Gelsenkirchen, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Mesut Özil (Gelsenkirchen, Nordrhein-Westfalen), André Schürrle (Ludwigshafen, Rheinland-Pfalz), Bastian Schweinsteiger (Kolbermoor, Bayern), Roman Weidenfeller (Diez, Rheinland-Pfalz), Ron-Robert Zieler (Köln, Nordrhein-Westfalen)

Players born in the former DDR (1)

Toni Kroos (Greifswald, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern)

Players born outside Germany (2)

Miroslav Klose (Oppeln, Poland), Lukas Podolski (Gleiwitz, Poland)


UEFA European Championship France 2016

The twenty-three man squad selected for the 2016 European Championship finals had an even bigger western flavour, with no fewer that twenty-one players born in the Länder that were once part of the former Federal Republic of Germany. Miroslav Klose’s retirement after the World Cup in 2014 meant that Lukas Podolski was the only player born outside Germany, and as in 2012 Toni Kroos was the sole flag bearer for the former East.

With the squad getting younger, eleven of the twenty-three players were born after German unification. By 2018, they should make up the majority.

Players born in the former BRD/Western Länder (21)

Jérôme Boateng (Berlin-West, Berlin), Emre Can (Frankfurt am Main, Hessen), Julian Draxler (Gladbeck, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Mario Götze (Memmingen, Bayern), Mario Gómez (Riedlingen, Baden-Württemberg), Jonas Hector (Saarbrücken, Saarland), Benedikt Höwedes (Haltern, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Mats Hummels (Bergisch Gladbach, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Sami Khedira (Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg), Joshua Kimmich (Rottweil, Baden-Württemberg), Bernd Leno (Bietigheim-Bissingen, Baden-Württemberg), Thomas Müller (Weilheim, Bayern), Shkodran Mustafi (Bad Hersfeld, Hessen), Manuel Neuer (Gelsenkirchen, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Mesut Özil (Gelsenkirchen, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Leroy Sané (Essen, Nordrhein-Westfalen), André Schürrle (Ludwigshafen, Rheinland-Pfalz), Bastian Schweinsteiger (Kolbermoor, Bayern), Jonathan Tah (Hamburg, Hamburg), Marc-André ter Stegen (Mönchengladbach, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Julian Weigl (Bad Aibling, Bayern)

Players born in the former DDR (1)

Toni Kroos (Greifswald, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern)

Players born outside Germany (1)

Lukas Podolski (Gleiwitz, Poland)


As illustrated by the graph below, the number of national team representatives from Eastern Germany reached its peak of seven in 2002, but since then there had been a noticeable decline, with only one player – the Greifswald-born Toni Kroos – making the squad on a regular basis since the turn of the decade. There was a slight improvement in the figures for the 2012 European Championship finals squad, with Kroos being joined by Magdeburg-born Marcel Schmelzer.

While the number of players born outside Germany peaked at five during the 2008 Euros and the 2010 World Cup, the recent retirement of Lukas Podolski and the lack of foreign-born players among recent call-ups means that this number should drop to zero for the 2018 World Cup in Russia.

Graphical Statistical Data

Composition of German squads since Euro 1992, the first tournament played after the incorporation of the DFV into the DFB.

Like, Link, Share, Enjoy, usw.

    4 thoughts on “Ossis v Wessis - a statistical analysis

    • Pingback: One can call it Ossification…the demographics of the new Germany | Bundesliga Fanatic

    • Pingback: Schwarz und Weiß | Blog | One could call it Ossification…

    • May 12, 2012 at 02:50
      Permalink

      It’s an interesting one, and it would make an excellent study that covers both sport and demographics.

      I would tend to focus on the club structure in the former East; many of the great DDR clubs simply sunk without trace, and it has been a hard struggle for those that are still around fighting for their existence in the professional leagues. Just look at Hansa Rostock for example.

      With Eastern German clubs struggling, only a few players from their youth setups will be noticed – and these will always be the exceptional ones like Toni Kroos and Borussia Mönchengladbach’s Tony Jantschke, the only Ossi in the current Under-21 side.

      I am actually digging a little deeper into this subject, so watch this space.

      Reply
    • May 12, 2012 at 02:34
      Permalink

      So, less players from the former GDR area, but a corresponding increase in the number of immigrants since @ 2000. Any explanation for the gradual attrition of Ossis? Something to do with clubs in that area? Attitudes towards players from the former GDR? Ballack was/is certainly a very polarizing figure, at least among some fans. I’m not German, so I don’t have the best grasp of the situation.

      Reply

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *